You are viewing zophos

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Chemistry question

moss
In baking, are the sum of the calories of the individual ingredients equal to the calories present in the finished product? Josh says that the magic of baking means that at the end, it could have MORE calories. Confirm/Deny?

Comments

( 14 comments — Leave a comment )
kookamess
Aug. 4th, 2009 02:47 am (UTC)
Deny.
(Deleted comment)
zophos
Aug. 4th, 2009 03:37 am (UTC)
I hadn't thought about the caloric density.

His argument had something to do with creating new... sugar chains or something. I'm sure he'll comment and let us know.
monsieurlove
Aug. 4th, 2009 03:56 am (UTC)
Well - I freely admit I could be wrong, but my thinking was: baking is really just chemistry, right? So maybe the baking process could create larger, more complex molecules that one might have had before the baking. Isn't it really in the chemical bonds that calories live? I'm thinking more in terms of thermochemical calories, I guess though - so maybe we should be saying "joules" to remove possible confusion.
unkle_social
Aug. 4th, 2009 03:08 pm (UTC)
baking is chemistry, but very simply so. You're over complicating it.
princessmargo
Aug. 4th, 2009 03:33 am (UTC)
I think it's probably the same. :P But I like the way Josh thinks, as usual.
czeano
Aug. 4th, 2009 04:08 am (UTC)
IN THIS OVEN WE OBEY THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS.
zophos
Aug. 4th, 2009 04:31 am (UTC)
That occurred to me, but I couldn't remember what it was called. Yes, I suck at science.
monsieurlove
Aug. 4th, 2009 04:56 am (UTC)
"The increase in the internal energy of a system is equal to the amount of energy added by heating the system, minus the amount lost as a result of the work done by the system on its surroundings."

So the question is: is the thing being baked doing any "work" in a physics sense? We already know the system is being heated!
monsieurlove
Aug. 4th, 2009 05:15 am (UTC)
I suppose this all depends on how the energy of the system is increased. Certainly there is more kinetic energy expressed as heat, but I am specifically thinking about the chemical potential energy of the system.
ratnix
Aug. 4th, 2009 04:23 am (UTC)
My intuition says it stays the same. I could imagine calorie count decreasing if there's some proteins that get wrecked by the heat in baking and becomes... uh... this non-caloric ex-protein that I've just invented.

This is all very scientific handwaving I'm doing.
teh_dirty_robot
Aug. 4th, 2009 04:34 am (UTC)
Deny! It's the caloric sum of its parts at the end of baking.
modernangel
Aug. 4th, 2009 08:19 am (UTC)
If anything, the parts of food that have any food-energy value all tend to break apart into simpler chemicals during cooking, releasing chemical energy in the process. Processes that increase caloric density tend to be subtle and organic, like fermentation.
jethro_bodine
Aug. 4th, 2009 10:19 am (UTC)
You cannot create or destroy calories; after all it is just a measure of energy. I must agree with the Senator from Florida, however, that if anything one would tend to rearrange long-chain sugars into short-chain sugars. Lipids are typically more resistant to this sort of breakdown.
trunkbutt
Aug. 4th, 2009 01:49 pm (UTC)
I'M PRETTY SURE I DON'T WANT TO KNOW THE ANSWER EITHER WAY.

( 14 comments — Leave a comment )

Profile

moss
zophos
The Insidious Dr. Fu Manchu
del.icio.us bookmarks
Powered by LiveJournal.com